With twenty minutes to go, I just wanted to wish my wonderful sister, @dariennearahan a Happy Siblings Day! From back then till the end, I will always be here to support and be proud of you! Love ya very much! :)

With twenty minutes to go, I just wanted to wish my wonderful sister, @dariennearahan a Happy Siblings Day! From back then till the end, I will always be here to support and be proud of you! Love ya very much! :)

formatnoauto
Much of our understanding of art and culture is taken for granted at best, superficial and inconsequential at worst. Worst because we view the role of art and culture as insignificant and not as a meaningful part of an urban, regional, or national economy. We take it as more fun and less business. And so, although policymakers and urban economists are versed in the mechanics of urban economies or how we think cities work, the role of art and culture is left out of this basic paradigm of city growth and vitality, why some cities are more or less successful than others, and what components are necessary to generate great, vibrant places where people want to live.
Elizabeth Currid, The Warhol Economy, 2008 (via formatnoauto)
pinoy-culture

pinoy-culture:

Filipina Activist Named New Special Rapporteur on Rights of Indigenous Peoples
Original Article [x]

The United Nations has named Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, a Filipina Indigenous leader and activist, as the next UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Corpuz, a member of the Kankana-ey Igorot people of the Cordillera region in the northern Philippines, will be the first woman to hold this position.

Corpuz has been a leader in Indigenous issues for decades. Corpuz joined the Indigenous Peoples movement in Cordillera in the 1970s and headed the Cordillera Peoples Alliance (CPA) from 1992-1994. Corpuz lobbied before the United Nations for more than 20 years to bring the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) to fruition, and was the first Filipina to hold the position of chairperson of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII) in 2007. Corpuz cofounded Tebtebba: the Indigenous Peoples’ International Center for Policy Research and Education in 1996, and is a convener of the Asian Indigenous Women’s Network.

“Vicky’s lifetime commitment and passion in her own country has been evident in the way in which she has supported the rights of Indigenous Peoples. Her ability to emphasize, network, and support other Indigenous Peoples across the world as well as working collaboratively and constructively with governments globally makes her an excellent choice,” says Maori Party co-leader Tariana Turia.

Corpuz was chosen from 14 other candidates for the position; Corpuz herself says she is surprised she was chosen because most of the other nominees had obtained Masters or Doctoral degrees, while Corpuz holds an undergraduate nursing degree; she identifies her many years of work in the field as her best qualification for the job.

“The local Indigenous Peoples movement will have a hearing ear to their complaints and whatever is reported to me, based on strong evidence, I will reach out to the necessary authorities and actors who should address these,” says Corpuz.

Corpuz says that while she holds this position she will focus on the impact of big business, such as mining, plantations, and narco-trafficking, on the rights and land of Indigenous Peoples. Corpuz is expected to be formally appointed to the position on March 28th, the last day of the 25thsession of the UN Human Rights Council, taking place now in Geneva. Corpus follows current UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples James Anaya, a Native American lawyer and professor who was recently nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize.

pinoy-culture
pag-asaharibon:

Filipino-American group sets Guinness World Record for most people performing native dance

More than 360 people, including more than 100 East Texans, brought a taste of the Phillipines to AT&T Stadium in Arlington on the morning of January 18 to set a Guinness World Record.
The Filipino-American Association of East Texas coordinated efforts to set a record for the most people performing tinikling, a traditional Filipino dance, simultaneously.
People from East Texas and around the nation gathered to dance, and while Guinness required only 250 people to dance for at least five minutes, more than 360 people graced the turf at AT&T Stadium.
Tinikling involves two people beating, tapping and sliding bamboo poles on the ground, as two dancers gracefully step over and in between the poles.
Proceeds and donations from the event, which asked $25 from each participant and spectator, went to a proposed Children With Disabilities Center at the De La Salle Health Sciences Institute in Dasmariñas, Philippines.
Dr. Cecille Licuan, dean of the College of Rehabilitation Sciences at De La Salle, said the wish to build a center for children with disabilities started in 2011, when the school’s alumni decided to advocate for a good cause.
Ramona Santos, vice chancellor of academics at De La Salle, said that she suggested advocating for children with disabilities, because she is a rehabilitation medicine physician.
Dr. Licuan said out of 93 million households in the Philippines, about 2 percent have children with disabilities living in them, and 30 percent of those are age 21 and younger.
Because of poverty, “a significant majority (of children with disabilities) don’t receive the services they need — physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy and also education …” she said. “Since we are an academic institution offering these health services, we wanted to raise funds so we can bring down the services to the community’s level for free.”
She said the Leyte province — where tinikling originated — was one of the areas most affected by Typhoon Haiyan. A part of the proceeds also are benefiting typhoon victims.
Ed Santos, an event organizer from Tyler, said the record-setting dance was inspired by an event put on in September 2012, where East Texans broke a world record in Tyler for most people making spring rolls, known as lumpia in the Philippines, simultaneously.
That event was put on to benefit Ross Sajo, a mother of three diagnosed with terminal pancreatic cancer.
“It was a team idea, to have something common among the 7,000 islands (of the Philippines),” he said. “This is the national bamboo dance.”
Santos said tinikling was a great way to raise funds, because most people of Filipino blood at least know of the dance, and people trust the money is going to a good place, also no government agencies are involved.
“This way, we know where the money is going and at the same time, we wanted to do it big, and (AT&T Stadium) is a big facility. Everything in Texas is big. … This is our way of giving back. We love the Philippines, but we make our living here, so this is a big deal.”


Cool!

pag-asaharibon:

Filipino-American group sets Guinness World Record for most people performing native dance

More than 360 people, including more than 100 East Texans, brought a taste of the Phillipines to AT&T Stadium in Arlington on the morning of January 18 to set a Guinness World Record.

The Filipino-American Association of East Texas coordinated efforts to set a record for the most people performing tinikling, a traditional Filipino dance, simultaneously.

People from East Texas and around the nation gathered to dance, and while Guinness required only 250 people to dance for at least five minutes, more than 360 people graced the turf at AT&T Stadium.

Tinikling involves two people beating, tapping and sliding bamboo poles on the ground, as two dancers gracefully step over and in between the poles.

Proceeds and donations from the event, which asked $25 from each participant and spectator, went to a proposed Children With Disabilities Center at the De La Salle Health Sciences Institute in Dasmariñas, Philippines.

Dr. Cecille Licuan, dean of the College of Rehabilitation Sciences at De La Salle, said the wish to build a center for children with disabilities started in 2011, when the school’s alumni decided to advocate for a good cause.

Ramona Santos, vice chancellor of academics at De La Salle, said that she suggested advocating for children with disabilities, because she is a rehabilitation medicine physician.

Dr. Licuan said out of 93 million households in the Philippines, about 2 percent have children with disabilities living in them, and 30 percent of those are age 21 and younger.

Because of poverty, “a significant majority (of children with disabilities) don’t receive the services they need — physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy and also education …” she said. “Since we are an academic institution offering these health services, we wanted to raise funds so we can bring down the services to the community’s level for free.”

She said the Leyte province — where tinikling originated — was one of the areas most affected by Typhoon Haiyan. A part of the proceeds also are benefiting typhoon victims.

Ed Santos, an event organizer from Tyler, said the record-setting dance was inspired by an event put on in September 2012, where East Texans broke a world record in Tyler for most people making spring rolls, known as lumpia in the Philippines, simultaneously.

That event was put on to benefit Ross Sajo, a mother of three diagnosed with terminal pancreatic cancer.

“It was a team idea, to have something common among the 7,000 islands (of the Philippines),” he said. “This is the national bamboo dance.”

Santos said tinikling was a great way to raise funds, because most people of Filipino blood at least know of the dance, and people trust the money is going to a good place, also no government agencies are involved.

“This way, we know where the money is going and at the same time, we wanted to do it big, and (AT&T Stadium) is a big facility. Everything in Texas is big. … This is our way of giving back. We love the Philippines, but we make our living here, so this is a big deal.”

Cool!

jarjartumble

jarjartumble:

so lemme give yall a little background on this one. i currently dance on a hip hop team called project d. this thing was around christmas time at the studio where we we had a little secret santa thing organized. for part of my gift, i decided to learn a few pieces off of youtube for my assigned recipient. all of the choreo is his! i repeat: all off the choreo is his! he’s pretty dope so check him out. this one’s for you steven armendi haha hope you liked it. oh and p.s. this is not serious .. don’t judge me for the mess ups and lack of .. fullout-ness .. lol. enjoy! 

I am so proud of my lil brother, how he developed as a dancer so blast this!